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"The needs of our people are great, their need to travel, pursue education or treatment, attend to their businesses and families abroad, and also the need for open trade with Egypt." MUTUAL DISTRUST, COMMON INTERESTS The blossoming ties have been advanced by intense diplomacy, culminating last month in a visit by Ismail Haniyah, a deputy leader of Hamas, to meet Egyptian intelligence officials. A series of conferences on Palestinian affairs have also taken place in Egypt in recent months attended by figures from Palestinian factions. Organizers said the conferences were part of efforts to restore Egypt's regional role following the chaos of the 2011 Arab Spring revolts. "The situation now is returning to normal," said Elazb al-Tayeb Taher, writer on Arab affairs at the state-owned Al-Ahram newspaper, which

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hosted one of the conferences in November. "Egyptian intelligence is restoring its relationship with Hamas in accordance with certain guidelines, chief amongst them being that Hamas does not become a major gateway for threats from Gaza targeting Egypt's national security." Despite mutual distrust, Hamas and Egypt kept communication channels

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open, with Hamas officials regularly invited to Egypt. But ties hit a low in 2013, after

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Sisi overthrew President Mohamed Mursi, banned the Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist organization and jailed many of its supporters. Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis, a militant group that emerged in North Sinai in the chaos of 2011 and initially attacked Egypt's gas pipelines to Israel, turned its guns on Egyptian forces. In 2014, it joined Islamic State and has since attacked in Cairo, killing 28 people in a church in December. 'EARLY TO TALK OF TRADE' Blockaded by Israel and facing the closure of their only other outlet, Gazans dug thousands of tunnels to smuggle in building materials and consumer goods and, according to Egyptian officials, smuggle out arms and fighters. In a bid to crush the militants, Egypt's military razed hundreds of homes and destroyed at least 2,000 tunnels. Curfews, checkpoints and air strikes have devastated an area that once drew holidaymakers to its Mediterranean shore.